Monday, October 5, 2015

Should You Try Oil Pulling?

At Natural Healing Tools we don't know every answer for every health practice - so when a caller asks a question, we do research and get them an answer. This information we like to share on our newsletter as well. Oil pulling is something we found many articles about but the one from WebMD seemed clear, well researched and made sense. We are passing along this information and suggest you do your own homework, consult your own dentist and health professionals before trying any new program at home.   - Natural Healing Tools

We explore the ancient oral health technique to see if it's all it's cracked up to be.
By Colleen Oakley
WebMD Magazine - Feature
Reviewed by Eric Yabu, DDS
 
Maybe you've seen something about it on the Internet, or a friend of a friend swears by it -- but you're not sure exactly what it is. Oil pulling is a growing trend, but it's not new.
"This oral therapy is a type of Ayurvedic medicine [a traditional Indian system] that dates back 3,000 years," says Jessica T. Emery, DMD, owner of Sugar Fix Dental Loft in Chicago. "It involves swishing approximately 1 tablespoon of oil -- typically coconut, sesame, or sunflower oil -- in your mouth for about 20 minutes and then spitting it out."

Unlike some so-called natural home remedies, it's not a practice that's based on pseudo-science. Recent studies show that oil pulling helps against gingivitis, plaque, and microorganisms that cause bad breath. How? "Most microorganisms inhabiting the mouth consist of a single cell," Emery says. "Cells are covered with a lipid, or fatty, membrane, which is the cell's skin. When these cells come into contact with oil, a fat, they naturally adhere to each other."

Oil-Pulling Tips

Use coconut oil. While you can get the same bacteria-fighting benefits with sesame or sunflower oil, coconut oil has the added benefit of lauric acid, which is well-known for its anti-microbial agents, Emery says, making it more effective. Also, a recent study found that coconut oil may help prevent tooth decay.

Start with just 5 minutes a day. Twenty minutes of swishing is a long time, and while the longer you pull, the more bacteria you'll remove, 5 or 10 minutes will still offer some benefit. Also, if your jaw starts aching a few minutes in, slow down. "Don't work too hard," Emery says. "A gentle swishing, pushing, and sucking the oil through the teeth is all that's required."

Don't swallow. "If you find it hard not to, you likely have too much oil in your mouth," Emery says. "Spit it out and try again with a smaller amount." Also, don't spit it down the sink, as the oil could clog your pipes. Just discard the used oil into the nearest trash can.

Don't skip brushing and flossing. "Oil pulling should never replace routine dental visits and traditional home oral care," Emery says. "It doesn't reverse the effects of tooth decay, but it's a great supplemental therapy."

Expert Tip

"Coconut and sunflower oil aren't the only oils with dental health benefits. For irritated, inflamed gums, rub a little vitamin E oil directly on the surface. It's rich in antioxidants, easily absorbed, and helps regenerate healthy gum tissue." -- Jessica Emery, DMD

Reviewed on June 04, 2014